every piece of every puzzle has a place…

“Do you ever feel like life is pushing us toward something,
some greater purpose?”

Spencer Stone

Clint Eastwood said it was just a story about ordinary people doing extraordinary things.
And he was right.

And whereas the majority of the movie 15:17 to Paris is basically the lead-up backstory
to the real-life terror attack which unfolded that fateful August evening in 2015 aboard
a Thalys train bound for Paris…
The movie, the story, is more or less, a finished puzzle.

Rather it’s the pieces to this completed puzzle that’s really what’s important.
And these pieces are the lives of three boys who grew up to be in the right place
at the right time…not by odds but by Divine direction.

And if you doubt that, think of each incidence during the courses of the lives of three boys–
think of their ups and downs, their directions, their troubles, and failures.
Think of their lifelong friendship, think of the coming together of each
individual puzzle piece which could only fit together one way, and one way only.

Terror events that end happily…meaning that the bad guys are apprehended,
and where there may be wounded– no one dies…The setting rather is an uncrowded train
full of individuals on holiday or simply commuters and is not a crowded concert hall,
not a crowded street, not a large office building…
these events readily fade more rapidly versus the larger and more televised terror melees
which we live with for years.

Such is a reason as to why telling this story is important.

The movie has received less than stellar reviews.

Clint Eastwood, as director, is taking a lot of heat for producing what is being
perceived as an uncharacteristically poor performing film.
His choice to use the actual boys, who are indeed the real-life heroes,
is being seen as a near catastrophic move for the making or breaking of the film…
which is being seen, more or less, as breaking.

Whereas Eastwood had cast Tom Hanks in the role of Sully Sullenberger in his movie
about the pilot who successfully ‘crash’ landed a fully loaded passenger plane
on the Hudson River, a choice which most critics saw as genius,
here he opted to use nonactors.
A less than genius move so say the critics.

Yes, the movie is a little slow.
Yes, the boys are a little stiff—but they aren’t actors…
A little fact I actually found welcoming.

The flow of the tale is a little awkward bouncing between present and past, past and present.
But you know, I didn’t want to see an actor’s portrayal of this story, I wanted the real deal.
I didn’t want Hollywood, I wanted the nitty gritty of the actual, not the glamorized fictional.

Now we all know I loved the movie the Darkest Hour—but there were many liberties taken
with the historical truth in that film.
Scenes that were totally fictional, cloyingly sentimental which played directly to
the viewer’s emotions.

15:17 to Paris was just what it was…real, raw and unpolished.

However it was what played out in each one of these boys lives,
from the first day they met in junior high, down to what lead each one of them to be on
that particular train on that particular evening of that particular year…
which was the catalyst for preventing a horrendous catastrophe.

The pieces of the puzzle were put into motion long before August 21, 2015.

It’s the details of these three boys lives, the hand of God, which rested on each of them,
the prayers and faith of parents which all catapulted them, leading them to that particular
train coming out of Amsterdam taking them to Paris,
a city they had been very reluctant to visit.

Each puzzle piece as seen by the nonbeliever, the jaded and skeptic would simply
be seen as coincidental.

Coincidence that Stone did not make his hoped-for area of focus with the Pararescue team
due to a lack of depth perception.
This leads him rather reluctantly and begrudgingly to take coursework in paramedics…
of which came into play as he held his hand deep in the neck on the bleeding carotid artery
of the shooting victim on the train, keeping this man alive versus his bleeding out.

A life of failures, slamming closed doors, knocks and hard licks all preparing each
ordinary boy, now grown man, pushing them toward the extraordinary.

Extraordinary by the ordinary, something Eastwood reminds each of us in the sharing
of this real-life story with the real-life individuals involved.
Nothing fancy, nothing glamorous, nothing high tech nor over the top.

This has been an important reminder for me which I suspect will be an important
reminder for many of us.

This is not a Hollywood type of movie.
This is not an Oscar would-be movie.
I doubt Eastwood considered such or perhaps didn’t care about such when wanting to
remind us of the whats and whys when it comes to the making of an ordinary puzzle piece.
Puzzle pieces that have each been pre-ordained to fit together.

Or at least that’s how I see it.

May each of us who are indeed ordinary step up to the extraordinary when we are so called.

Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.
John 15:13

34 comments on “every piece of every puzzle has a place…

  1. Lynda says:

    Such truth in this post. There are no coincidences in God’s world – just a loving Presence who desires the best for each person. Thinking of the little one who will be joining your family very soon!

  2. Yes, God is always at work.. every piece of the puzzle is in His hand…

  3. atimetoshare.me says:

    Praying that your testing come out well. Big week for you, my friend. haven’t seen this movie, but it sounds like a good one.

  4. SLIMJIM says:

    Good review; I think the theme of “ordinary vs extraordinary” makes it powerful to use the ordinary heroes who aren’t actors to play the part in the movie.
    I like your quote: “I doubt Eastwood considered such or perhaps didn’t care about such when wanting to remind us of the whats and whys when it comes to the making of an ordinary puzzle piece. Puzzle pieces that have each been pre-ordained to fit together.”

    I have this feeling that long after Eastwood is here on this side of eternity that the critics would be more favorable to him for making this film and the point he’s trying to make using the real heroes for this film.
    Good take on providence too by the way!

  5. Wally Fry says:

    I have to confess to not being familiar with the story, but thanks for giving me something to check out, Julie

  6. It sounds great despite what Hollywood may say! I’m putting this on my “must see” list! Thank you , Julie! ❤ ❤

  7. Dawn Marie says:

    “but they aren’t actors…
A little fact I actually found welcoming.” It May just be a better world if we were watching less ‘acting’ & more ‘real-life’ occurrences.

  8. RobbyeFaye says:

    Julie, I haven’t seen this yet. I know the family wants to see it soon.

    I did see the Darkest Hour. It was very interesting and covered so much for the short time it depicted. As you may have guessed from some of my blogs, I’m a little partial to Churchill!

    Thanks for the review!

    Blessings~

  9. RobbyeFaye says:

    Julie,

    Just another quick note!

    I read your review to hubs, he (like myself) really liked and appreciated it. He, in fact, asked me to save it for him.

    Thanks again!!

    Blessings~

    Robbie

  10. dbp49 says:

    Thanks for the review. I’ve always appreciated Mr. Eastwood’s work, and all you’ve mentioned has pretty much convinced me that this one will also be worth seeing. Thanks again.

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