taking the middle ground

For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill.
John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity” (1630)

“Being thus arrived in a good harbor and brought safe to land,
they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of heaven,
who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all
the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feete on the firme and stable earth…
Having undertaken, for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Fatih and Honor
of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony”

William Bradford: History of Plymouth Plantation c. 1650

According to History.com, William Bradford was a founder as well as a longtime governor
of the Plymouth Colony.

He was one of the original Mayflower passengers and signed the Mayflower Compact.
Bradford helped to draft the legal code ” and facilitated a community centered on
private subsistence agriculture and religious tolerance.
Around 1630, he began to compile his two-volume “Of Plymouth Plantation,”
one of the most important early chronicles of the settlement of New England.”

Bradford was a staunch member of the Separatist Chruch, a church body that was opposed
to the Chruch of England’s dominance over the lives of all English citizens.
The Church was (is) a state church overseen by the sitting monarch and so religious
groups such as the Separatists,
who were opposed to the Catholic influence over the Church,
felt an increasing need to find a place that was more open and tolerant to
varying sects of Christianity.

So as a young man, Bradford left England, moving to the Dutch Republic (Holland)
where religious freedoms were more widely permitted.

Bradford eventually married and began a family—
but as time went on, there was concern over the encroaching strong Dutch influence
upon the English Seperatirt’s children…
This was the impetus needed for the Separatists to seek a new life in a new land.
Thus joining the Mayflower pilgrims…pilgrims seeking a new land, a God-fearing land,
yet a God-fearing land accepting of a diverse Chrisitan faith, Bradford and his family
made the perilous journey across the Atlantic.

“Bradford’s history was singular in its tendency to separate religious from
secular concerns.
Unlike similar tracts from orthodox Massachusetts Bay,
Bradford did not interpret temporal affairs as the inevitable unfolding of
God’s providential plan.
Lacking the dogmatic temper and religious enthusiasm of the Puritans of the
Great Migration, Bradford steered a middle course for Plymouth Colony between the
Holy Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the tolerant secular community of Rhode Island.

A common sense sort of man…seeking the middle ground in a new world.
Which leaves me wondering, when I watch and hear what’s taking place around this
nation of ours, a nation that was once the hope of a people seeking to
worship the God of all Creation as that of His created while worshiping that of
His risen son…worshiping in the tolerance of varying denominations,
I wonder where that nation has gone…as that notion of worshiping the Creator…
a nation under God, is now fraught with grave contention.

David Fiorazo begins his book, The Cost of Our Silence,
with this look back to our founding as a God-fearing, Christian tolerant nation…
albeit when the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, the idea of a “nation” was something
far from their thinking.
Theirs was simply the thinking of survival while building a new life in a new world.

Survival, living, worshiping and finding a place of happiness and peace.

David notes that in the earliest days in this land, when Christians experienced
hard times, their desperation caused them to rely on God.

Conversely, when things are going well, we (now) often choose to rely on ourselves.

Throughout history, the Lord often allowed persecution in order to turn people back to Him.

Men came to these shores hoping to establish a God-fearing settlement that would flourish
on faith and freedom.

So opens Chapter 1 “What’s Happening to Our Heritage?” in David Fiorazo’s book.

And so I will leave us today with this one thought offered by David…

“Has God removed His hand of protection and Providence from our nation?”

As William Bradford was near death, he reflected on life in the new land
by way of a journal entry.
He had been governer as well as a major designer in the community,
establishing the standard of living, the laws,
the judicial system as well as the economic system to be used
for that of Plymouth as well as the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
Most importantly he helped to establish what was to be the spiritual life of
these early communities. A spiritual life based on the acknowledgment of God
and that of His Divine intent for His created in this new land…
along with an acceptance of how each man and woman would worship..
It was to be the basis for our religious tolerance today…

Bradford found himself opining the sentiment that this once dutiful Nation was
beginning to actually show the early signs, signs during Bradford’s own lifetime,
signs which seem to be coming into full fruition today,
that this nation was and is finding herself no longer willing to acknowledge the Creator
of all of the Universe…
nor is she willing to afford those who continue to call themselves Christians the
God given rights to do so.

And so we now ask ourselves…Has God removed His hand of protection and Providence
from our nation… because we first removed our faith and belief in Him…?

Shortly before his death, Governor Bradford wrote a journal entry:
“O sacred bond, whilst inviolably preserved?
How sweet and precious were the fruits that flowed from the same!
But when this fidelity decayed, then their ruin approached.
O that these ancient members had not died or been dissipated
(if it had been the will of God)
or else that this holy care and constant faithfulness had still lived,
and remained with those that survived…
But (alas) that subtle serpent hath slyly wound himself under fair pretenses of necessity
and the like, to untwist these sacred bonds and ties…
I have been happy, in my first times, to see, and with much comfort to enjoy,
the blessed fruits of this sweet communion, but it is now a part of my misery in old age,
to find and feel the decay and want thereof (in a great measure)
and with grief and sorrow of heart to lament and bewail the same.
And for others’ warning and admonition, and my own humiliation, do I here note the same.”

22 comments on “taking the middle ground

  1. Tricia says:

    As a descendant of Mayflower pilgrims, I appreciated this post. It’s interesting how today religious tolerance means no religion to a certain political party, or one that’s so watered down it has no meaning. We shall see I guess if God’s hand of protection has been removed from our nation. Couldn’t exactly blame hi if so.

    • Me too Tricia!!— my grandmother was a Daughter of the Mayflower as she went 10 generations back to Pricilla Mullins — I’ve got all her documents and paperwork and membership papers but my cousins and I have not followed suit— despite having all of her paperwork I will still need her birth certificate and death certificate as well as Dad’s and I will have to drive down to the small middle georgia town where she was born to get copies— and one day she will!

      • Tricia says:

        That’s so cool Julie! My dad was in the Mayflower Society and I think at some point by default that meant I was too but I’m not positive. Maybe this shared heritage is why we get along so well. 🙂

      • It does but like me you have to follow through with the documentation — — I figured they’d take the paperwork I had from my grandmother and they will but they also want my paperwork— birth certificate for myself then those of dad and nany’s along with applicable marriage certificates— it’s a dot the i’s sort of documentation thing— which I totally get— so you and I were actually friends way back when 🤗

      • Tricia says:

        I knew it! Perhaps our ancestors knew each other. How cool to think of that.

      • I know right?! And I would think that on that boat, they most all knew one another by the time they made it ashore 🙂

    • * one day I will…. gotta love my autocorrect 😑

  2. atimetoshare.me says:

    I love how you weave your knowledge of history into your thoughts on religion and the state of the world. They are intertwined, aren’t they? I believe that there is still a strong Christian base in our country. With all the political correctness, it becomes difficult to speak the truth without offending someone. Isn’t it sad that we wait until there’s no other choice, but to rely on God?

  3. Wally Fry says:

    How cool! Thomas Rogers and Frances Cooke here! We were always eligible for all of that, but we weren’t very froo froo, so we never joined any of that stuff.

  4. Some very essential questions to ask ourselves here. Thought-provoking and serious post, Julie!! Excellent! 💜💜

  5. Dawn Marie says:

    Another wonderful post Julie. I greatly appreciate your passion to help ignite our own enthusiasm of encouragement to those who have lost this focus, in their lives. There is such meaning & purpose in living out a life built upon “In God We Trust.” I pray to do a better job testifying to this truth through my own life, lived out! Hugs for being a wonderful mentor!

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