Our duty to God connects us to our duty to our fellowman

“Great love can change small things into great ones,
and it is only love which lends value to our actions.”

St. Faustina Kowalska


(Getty image)

Our duty.

Duty is a word that we either take seriously or take begrudgingly—we either
feel a sense of responsibility or a sense of dread.

The definition: a task or action that someone is required to perform.

So, like it or not, the truth of the matter is that we were created for duty.
A duty first to our Creator then secondly to our fellow man…

If we would each take this sense of duty seriously…
things in this nation of ours just might look very differently…
as in ‘different’ in a very positive way…

“And it is only by the observance of the first and greatest commandment
that we can keep the second.
The more we love God, the more we shall love man; the less we love God,
the less we shall, in the true sense of the word, love man.
Our love will become capricious, fitful, and unreliable—not charity,
but passion.
If you feel that your love for your fellowman is dying out in the fumes of selfishness,
there is but one way to revive it: strive for, pray for, the love of God.
As the heart turns toward its source, it will be quickened and expanded.
There is no true, no lasting spirit of charity apart from the practice of religion.
Therefore, we cannot keep those commandments which teach us our duty to men unless
we are keeping those which teach us our duty to God.”

Fr. Basil W. Maturin, p. 160
An Excerpt From
Christian Self-Mastery

Child of Grace

You are a child of grace.
If God gave you grace, because he gave it freely, then you should love freely.
Do not love God for the sake of a reward; let God be your reward!

St. Augustine

“It is undoubtedly true that each of us, men and women,
irresponsible and thoughtless as we often are,
hold within our hands the happiness and sorrows of others.
We cannot help it or escape from it. The power is in us inalienably
almost from birth to death—in us, because we are persons—-
and we are responsible for the use we make of it.
Indeed, so mysterious is this power that the very presence of a person
who does not realize his responsibility is often the source of the keenest
pain of all…
The failure to exercise the power to give happiness to others is not
merely negative in its results; it is the source of the most positive
suffering of all.
Thus there is no escape from the responsibility involved in the possession
of this power.
Not to use it where it is due is to destroy all happiness.
Strange power, indeed, to be committed to such weak and unworthy hands;
yet there could be but one thing worse: that none could interfere with the
joys and sorrows of others.
We might envy their happiness and pity their sorrows, but we could not help them.
It would be a world of isolated individuals wrapped in inviolable selfishness;
each must take care of himself and the world must go its way.”

Fr. Basil W. Maturin, p. 149
An Excerpt From
Christian Self-Mastery